Paper Vs. Kindle

 

*Disclaimer*

Trying out a new research article format, enjoy!

“Books are a uniquely portable magic.”- Stephen King. 

As Stephen King plainly points out, there is something very special about a good book. No one can really say that our world would be the same without both fiction and non-fiction alike. However, there is one very important debate that, in our very technologically advanced world, has surfaced over the years in the booklover’s community: electronic readers versus the old-fashioned paperback book.

Most people born from 1990-1998 grew up only reading real books, the real thing. However, the people born anywhere from 2000 on have had both books and technology available to them. As both generations have gotten older the world has continued to advance. This has caused the once easy decision between books or  books to become more complicated.

Most people, who have bought a kindle, nook, or other kind of electronic reader, use the argument that they are investing in their “reading” future. They claim that paying a hundred dollars or more for an electronic device will help them save money in the long run, because books are “cheaper” in the electronic bookstore in comparison to the actual store. This is technically true because there can be almost a fifty percent difference in price, for certain books.

However, when you look at how many people actually finish the books in their figurative bookshelves on their electronic device, they end up paying money for books that they usually end up not even finishing. People are more likely to finish a physical book because they can see how much is left, can enjoy the cover, and just have an overall drive to finish the story.

Like most who are “real” book lovers, they claim that the touch and feel of a real book causes them to be able to connect better with the story and better visualize the actions and voices of the characters. They even say that the extra money you have to pay for the books is well worth it, because you can physically touch the book. Also, people who dislike electronic readers complain about the bright light of the screen which causes headaches and blurry vision.

However, real books can be bulky and hard to travel with, which is not the case with electronic readers. The kindles and nooks are very portable and you do not need wifi to read books off of them, which makes them perfect for long car or plane rides.

There are many advantages to both electronic readers and physical books and this debate is one that will probably last a very long time. It is mostly a preference, so neither can be said to be better than the other. So the case of Paper vs. Kindle will have to remain unsolved with no apparent compromise other than “agree to disagree”.

Sorry guys, but this is truly the conclusion that I had to come to. I interviewed countless college students and teens and found myself “agreeing to disagree”.

I tried to argue my point and to convince them that real  books are the way to go, but I found that every Kindle follower tended to shake their head  in a way that made me think, “Heathen!”

But, seriously, I used to think that anyone who was against paper books was against every bibliophile in the world! However, this article’s research process changed my mind on that. I found that just because they read books on little and big screens, :0, they actually were pretty well read. This just showed me that the feud that has been raging for years should stop. We need to rise above this fellow readers!

Join me in bringing peace to the BOOK-AHOLIC world!

Signing out for this week, your fellow Blogaholic,

-Hannah♥

 

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